Architecture of Iran

Posted by in General

I once visited a castle in Canada. Or what was supposed to be a castle. It was an industrial entrepreneur’s family home in Victoria on Vancouver island, vaguely immitating the style of a Scottish castle. Even though it was built in the 19th century, it rather looked like made of plastic. And yet, while lacking any historic relevance, it was made a museum. The Canadian friend who was with us back then was in awe. We Europeans shook our heads. No offence, Canadians… Why am I telling the story? I’m doing so because Iran is completely the opposite. A lot of buildings date back hundreds if not thousands of years ago. Mosques, bazars and palaces look majestic and yet they serve their purpose even today (except for the palaces, that retired after the Iranian revolution…). Iran is breathing history, a fact that reflects in people’s attititudes, their behaviour and their thinking, and also in the way they treat architecture.

And while I would have to include so many more significant buildings in this series, I would like to keep it short and show you only some highlights. Enjoy:

Masjed-e Vakil, Shiraz

Prayer hall of Masjed-e Vakil, Shiraz.

 

Masjed-e Vakil, Shiraz

Prayer hall of Masjed-e Vakil, Shiraz.

 

Masjed-e Nasir-al-Molk, Shiraz

Courtyard of Masjed-e Nasir-al-Molk, Shiraz.

 

Masjed-e Nasir-al-Molk, Shiraz

Tiles in coloured light during early morning in Masjed-e Nasir-al-Molk, Shiraz

 

Masjed-e Nasir-al-Molk, Shiraz

Prayer room in Masjed-e Nasir-al-Molk, Shiraz

 

Meydan-e Azadi, Teheran

Azadi Tower from below, Teheran.

 

Meydan-e Azadi, Teheran

Meydan-e Azadi at night, Teheran

 

Masjed-e Jameh, Yazd

Masjed-e Jameh, Yazd

 

Masjed-e Jameh, Yazd

Entrance gat of Masjed-e Jameh, Yazd

 

Bazar of Shiraz

Bazar of Shiraz

 

Ceiling in Kakh-e Ali Qapu, Esfahan

Ceiling in Kakh-e Ali Qapu, Esfahan

 

Kakh-e Ali Qapu, Esfahan.

Wall painting in Kakh-e Ali Qapu, Esfahan.

 

Masjed-e Sheikh, Lotfollah, Esfahan.

Ceiling of Masjed-e Sheikh Lotfollah, Esfahan.

 

Masjed-e Sheikh Lotfollah, Esfahan.

Masjed-e Sheikh Lotfollah, Esfahan.

 

Khan-e Abbasian, Kashan

The private house Khan-e Abbasian, Kashan

 

Kakh- Chehel Sotun, Esfahan

Inside the palace Kakh- Chehel Sotun, Esfahan

 

Masjed-e Shah, Esfahan.

Prayer hall in Masjed-e Shah, Esfahan.

 

Masjed-e Shah, Esfahan.

Masjed-e Shah, Esfahan.

 

Masjed-e Shah, Esfahan.

Masjed-e Shah, Esfahan.

 

And now, at last, the unexpected:

Kelisa-ya Vank, a church in the Armenian quarter, Esfahan

Kelisa-ya Vank, a church in the Armenian quarter, Esfahan

 

I hope you enjoy the Iranian architecture as much as I did…